Friday, April 24, 2020

Wild Fridays #16: Roving the Web

The things you find! I couldn't resist this one.


















I think the plums in the icebox must be one of the best-known poems ever – only surpassed by the red wheelbarrow (by the same poet, William Carlos Williams – but you knew that, didn't you?). I always thought that if I'd been on the receiving end of his little note that morning, I might not have felt too forgiving, even if it was in poetry.

Then there's this. Seems I'm not the only one to have this problem!  (If you read my haibun for Weekly Scribblings #15.)


There! Hope that boosted your immune system – laughter, we are told, being the best medicine.

They both came from facebook, actually. (It has its uses!) This one, which seems to have most things covered, came from there too:



Someone has pointed out, re item 4, that one shouldn't really need a to-do list to ensure tending to a child in one's care. Too true! But if we do have a child, a pet or a plant to look after, that's one item we can be sure of crossing off virtuously as 'done'. (I am keeping my plants alive; I am, I am! I'm just not weeding around them as often as I might....)

You probably saw Helen's terrific anti-meme poem in response to the latest Writers' Pantry. If not, scroll back a couple of posts from this to pick it up. Going back for a second read, I finally had a proper look at the meme she used as illustration. Oh yeah, I could get into that one – it's about writers!
click image to enlarge it

That's the trouble with memes, isn't it? Mostly they are a pest, but then one will pull you in. If you want to know (or even if you don't) as I told Helen, it's House #5 for me, no question. Not only does it include some of my favourite writers, but even more importantly, there is no-one there I dislike, or am merely lukewarm about.

I can forego Plath in order to spare myself Ayn Rand; Wilde and Brecht so as to miss Hunter S. Thompson; and even James Baldwin (sigh) if it means not encountering L. Ron Hubbard. And the combination of Mailer and Hemingway – and yes, even Joyce – would be way too misogynist for me. (Though it might be fun to watch Dorothy Parker deal with them.)

How about you? You are allowed to play in the Comments.

So I didn't have to rove far and wide through the web for those; rather they came to me. So did a newsletter in my email from Jean Shinoda Bolen, author and Goddess-centred feminist. (She describes herself as 'author, Jungian analyst, activist'.)

Her newsletter contained links to two YouTube videos of empty streets, along with some wise words presented as a poem. One shows streets in Ireland, the other America. Here is the Irish version, which includes audio.





In case you can't quite get all the words through the lovely accent, let me tell you what they tell us: that when when we see the empty streets, either when out walking or watching the news, what we are seeing is love in action. We are seeing how much we do care for each other – and that even though jobs, businesses and lives will be lost, 'It isn't the end of the world. It is the most remarkable act of global solidarity we may ever witness.' We are urged to let 'all that love' fill and sustain us.

May it indeed be so!

Stay safe and well, my friends.


Material shared here is presented for study and review. Poems, photos, and other writings and images remain the property of the copyright owners, usually the authors.

16 comments:

  1. I so enjoyed this one, Rosemary!đź’ť Memes are certainly getting around these days and offer a bit of respite if I am to be completely honest. I agree, it is an act of global solidarity! And I believe it has brought a lot of people together in terms of mutual encouragement, support and respect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, when you put it that way, it is kinda wonderful how people are reaching out and attempting to cheer each other in these strange and difficult times.

      Delete
  2. A fascinating post, Rosemary, with lots to linger over and reflect on. I did give my pick-for-dead-author-quarantine house a good think, but truly couldn't bring myself to pick one. Each house (while offering an array of brilliant larger-than-life occupants) seemed, as least to me, to hold (each, in its own unique way) all the ingredients one would need to put together an emotional quagmire … intensity … depression … dark thoughts … horrendous substance abuse issues … and on-and-on (as such, it seems, is so often the way of the truly gifted, cerebral, artistic personality).

    While short visits … perhaps the occasional weekender to each place (I've no doubt) would be incredible … 12 to 18 months (and beyond) quarantined in any one of these abodes, I suspect, would leave most of us (once sprung) seeking self-isolation for the rest of our days (though cooped up with any random 5 people for such a length of time, might well produce the same effect … with far less reward on the plus side) ~ smiles ~

    I enjoyed your thoughts on memes … something I am just now picking up on. And the video and narrative of Irish Streets was lovely … a welcome dose of perspective … in so much doom and gloom.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Forgive me, but I did have a good giggle at your opinion of spending time with some of these famous authors! Whilst in all seriousness agreeing that you're probably right. (Hardy was unfaithful, Tolstoy was mean to his wife, H. G. Wells was mean to his mistress ... beautiful, noble books don't necessarily reflect their writers' souls.)

      Delete
  3. Oh my, Rosemary, I'll never be a good writer, I'm the best to my wife. All the good adverbs I apply with abd/or to her. We've been married 47 years.
    I wasn't quite so good with my first, that marriage only lasted 13 years. Maybe I'm not perfect after all, thus I might could learn to write well.
    ..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know if it always comes with the territory! There must be nice famous writers too. Anyway, if you have to be in quarantine, I'm sure being with your wife is better than all the famous writers in the world!

      Delete
  4. Ha love this poem and the illustrations better than the red wheelbarrow,..About those shopping bags...it's a cynical plot to drive shoppers insane. The motivation will not be divulged due to political correctness, I would not want to spend time in isolation with any poets...Colin Firth maybe:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha ha ha ha ha! Didn't know Firth was a poet – no, I do know that's not quite what you meant. Mmm, yes ... and David Tennant would do nicely, too ... but I think that's a whole different conversation.

      Delete
  5. Rosemary, this are hilarious. The first one left me all shiny-eyed with laughter. The produce section one made me think of your recent prose piece--see? You are not alone! And well, the one about quarantine author is glorious. I, of course, would choose House #5 (and if they add Poe and Plath, then I would be in my own little bit of paradise).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, Poe and Plath could definitely come too! And hey, you and I would both be there, bonus.

      Delete
  6. I think Jackson and I can get rid of Rand together if we put our minds to it. Creepy lady team up for the win!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you, Rosemary, for sharing some humour during these trying times. and yes, the video, i really liked what the narrator said, it was very moving. I was just hoping the people over here can be like those over at Ireland.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope so too! I have been paying some attention to what is going on there, simply because I know one person there (you).

      Delete
  8. I enjoyed this, especially the meme at the top.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I''m glad you did, Jenna. I thought it was time to get a little lighter-hearted.

      Delete

Please be respectful of all the people on this site, as each individual writer is entitled to their own opinion, style, and path to creativity.